Japan GDP Annual Growth Rate 1981-2016

The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in Japan expanded 1.60 percent in the third quarter of 2015 over the same quarter of the previous year. GDP Annual Growth Rate in Japan averaged 2 percent from 1981 until 2015, reaching an all time high of 9.40 percent in the first quarter of 1988 and a record low of -9.40 percent in the first quarter of 2009. GDP Annual Growth Rate in Japan is reported by the Cabinet Office, Japan.

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Japan’s economy, the second largest in the world, is fully diversified and technologically advanced. Like in most developed countries, services account for the highest percentage of GDP (around 62 percent of GDP). Within services the most important once are wholesale and retail trade (around 7 percent of GDP) and real estate (around 6 percent of GDP). Manufacturing is the engine of the Japanese economy and accounts for nearly 22 percent of GDP. Construction also plays a significant role, accounting for around 5 percent of GDP. This page provides - Japan GDP Annual Growth Rate - actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news. Japan GDP Annual Growth Rate - actual data, historical chart and calendar of releases - was last updated on February of 2016.

Japanese Economy Avoids Recession in Q3

Cabinet Office tradingeconomics.com 12/8/2015 12:29:06 AM

The GDP in Japan advanced 0.3 percent on quarter in the three months to September of 2015, compared to an initial estimate of a 0.2 percent contraction and beating forecasts for a flat reading. Capital expenditure increased while inventories shrank less than expected, final figures showed.

Domestic demand edged up 0.1 percent, adding 0.1 percentage point to growth, compared to an initial estimate of a 0.3 percent drop.

Private consumption grew at a slower 0.4 percent (0.5 percent in the preliminary estimate), contributing 0.2 percentage point to the expansion (0.3 percent in the preliminary estimate). Private non-residential investment grew 0.6 percent, adding 0.1 percent to growth (down 1.3 percent and subtracting 0.2 percent to growth in the earlier release) while residential investment increased slightly more than expected (2 percent from 1.9 percent in the preliminary estimate, contributing 0.1 percentage point). Inventories subtracted 0.2 percentage point to growth, lower than an initial estimate of -0.5 percent.

Government spending rose 0.3 percent, adding 0.1 percent to the expansion, in line with earlier figures while public investment contracted 1.5 percent, subtracting 0.1 percent to growth (down 0.3 percent in the preliminary estimate).

External demand contributed 0.1 percentage point to growth, unchanged from the preliminary estimate. Exports grew 2.7 percent while imports shrank 1.7 percent.

On an annualized basis, the economy advanced 1 percent, compared to an initial 0.8 percent contraction and well above market expectations of a 0.1 percent increase.